“Prophecy” and a Confession, of Sorts


I was talking to my son about a logical glitch I have in a couple of my blog posts from a few months ago. He suggested that, instead of fixing them, I put a blog post about them.

English: Baptism of Christ

English: Baptism of Christ (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In one post, I was complaining about a self-styled “prophet” from America, who had made a “prophecy” that the Philippines would be a great nation and a beacon of God’s light to the world. I am purposely not choosing the exact words but you get the idea. I complained that this is not real prophecy. ALMOST ALWAYS, prophets exhort in the Bible. That is, they encourage people to good action. Even the book of Revelation is primarily exhortational. It was written to those suffering to warn them of more dangerous times, and to encourage them to remain faithful to the end (very much like the message of the Epistle to the Hebrews). The details are not unimportant, but not of primary importance. To give a “prophecy” regarding the future without exhortation is simply “tickling the ears.” It is akin to the fortune teller giving feel good information to a client. Here in the Philippines, people are much like those in the US (along with a number of warm-blooded animal species) in that they like their ears tickled. It adds to the popularity (and pockets) of the said “prophet.”

In a second post, I was complaining about a self-styled “prophet” from America (they all get over here to the Philippines eventually) who stated that a leader of a large religious movement here would be President of the Philippines… if the people would be faithful to God. Now, personally, having no interest in that individual ever running any particular organization… least of all government presidency, the prophetic exhortation encouraged me to want to be “unfaithful.” Still, I was annoyed by the message since it wasn’t testable… the “prophet” (“prophetess”) gave herself an out. If the person becomes president (hasn’t so far) she must be a true prophet of God. He the person does not become president… she wasn’t wrong, the people just weren’t faithful enough.

You will note, I placed these “prophets” in a no-win position. If there is no message of exhortation, I question that it could be a true message from God. If there is one, I question the individual’s unwillingness to truly be tested to see if what they have to say is from God.  That’s not really fair. I have to admit it.

Part of the trouble I have is with term “prophecy” itself. I would rather not see it used. Most times “prophecy” is used in the Bible, the term “exhortation” would appear to be more appropriate. Prophecies are usually not the fortuneteller type… but the word of exhortation or encouragement to be faithful and true to God. When the self-styled “prophets” (sorry… I just have to use quotation marks… can’t help it) go into fortuneteller mode… perhaps it would be better to utilize a different term. Maybe we could call it “apocalypsis.” The term is from the Latin for the revealing of what was covered or hidden. The reason for the different term would be to release us from the messy baggage of the world prophecy or prophet.

A prophet in the New Testament (and in the first century church) seemed to primarily be one who goes from church to church and preaches, encourages, and exhorts the membership to be faithful and holy. It is curious that in the Didache (apparently a first century work) prophecy was not to be questioned… but the prophet was to be tested. That seems to make no sense. Perhaps others would understand this better. To me it suggests the ambiguity of the role. Prophets were to be from God and to be received as if they were speaking God’s truth to us. Yet their message was not supposed to be innovative… but point people back to the words and life of Christ.

One passage that means a lot to me is John 15:26 – 16:4. In this, the Helper/Spirit of Truth will be sent from God the Father to testify regarding the Son. And the disciples are also to testify regarding Christ based on what they have seen and lived. There is more in the passage. A few findings from it seem to be:

  • The Disciples are to point people back to Jesus, His words, His example.
  • The Spirit of God also points back to Jesus.
  • In doesn’t seem to be a primary role of God’s disciples or the Spirit of God to be innovative but restoring people to the key truth in Christ.

Additionally notes from the passage:

  • Being a theist doesn’t mean one is better than an atheist. Atheists claim that theists can be really really evil since they can use their “god” as justification for nearly any heinous act. Jesus appears to agree with the charge of atheists here.
  • A healthy theism only exists with a true understanding of who God the Father is, and who Christ is.

I feel we need more people point people back to Christ… back to God… and less innovative speakers who start calling themselves prophets so as to be listened to. (I have made the argument among evangelicals here in the Philippines before that when pastors are not listened to, they change their title to bishop. When bishops don’t get listened to, they change their title to apostle. When apostles don’t listened to, they change their title to the “Appointed Son of God” or “Emperor of the Universe.”

So, there is my confession. I rejected prophecies because they have caveats and because they do not have caveats. Annoyingly, both arguments seem to be sound. Perhaps it is best not to think of them as prophecies at all (apocalypsis or otherwise) … but the opinions of people who want to be listened to.

Instead of using titles to try to get adherents, I believe we should focus more on pointing people to Christ… as witnessed and testified to by the Twelve, and confirmed in the Spirit of Truth.

<Bracketing my article with two VERY different perspectives below.>

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3 thoughts on ““Prophecy” and a Confession, of Sorts

  1. Interesting comments and thoughts. I would readily agree with you with regards to your concerns and comments on prophecy. As a Pentecostal, I believe in the gift of prophecy and its use in the right context. Firstly all prophecy according to scripture needs to be tested by scripture. Secondly true prophecy goes against scripture, but enforces it. Thirdly true prophecy confirms what has already been spoken. I’m not a theologian but in my simple understanding of the subject. On the other hand one thing that has concerned me regarding some of the so called prophecies about the Philippines and especially about the person whom received a so called prophecy that this person would become the president of the country, I feel that many Christians in then Philippines took that word and became very political themselves in and outside the church to get this person elected as president, This I felt brought a distortion among many in the church as well as divison within the body of Christ. I remember during the presidential election at that time, I heard of pastors campaigning from behind the pulpit, wearing t’shirts with a picture of the concerned Christian leader on the t’shirts with the words I Love ….. When the concerned person was not elected president many become discouraged or made some other remarks which I felt was not very Christian like….

    Another thing about prophecy, God is the one who fulfils it no man. When we try to fulfil a prophecy in our own strength it creates problems and set backs. Additionally scripture states that if someone prophecies and the word does not come to pass, that person is considered a false prophet. So we should be careful when we prophecy!

  2. Sorry I made a comment that reads true prophecy goes against scripture, I should have said that true prophecy does not go against scripture but enforces and affirms scripture.

    • Hey Jonathan, Thanks for your thoughts on this. As a non-Pentecostal/ non-Charismatic/ non-“ThirdWave”/and so forth, there is the tendency for me to assume that the (for example) Church of God (Tennessee variants) view of prophecy is normative to many. It helps to get another perspective to clarify things. Actually, I added to related posts at the bottom of the post. One of them things that ALL prophecy is ended with the end of the NT era. The other one seems to think that it is really important for Christians to get lots of prophecies for the various prophets around them. I feel both views are are to extreme in their particular directions.

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